Increased Precautions We're Taking in Response to COVID-19

LAST UPDATED ON 03/15/2021

As updates on the impact of the coronavirus continue to be released, we want to take a moment to inform you of the heightened preventative measures we have put in place at Sierra Tucson to keep our patients, their families, and our employees safe. All efforts are guided by and in adherence to the recommendations distributed by the CDC.

Please note that for the safety of our patients, their families, and our staff, there are certain restrictions in place regarding on-site visitation at Sierra Tucson.

  • These restrictions have been implemented in compliance with updated corporate and state regulations to further reduce the risks associated with COVID-19.
  • Options for telehealth visitation are continuously evaluated so that our patients can remain connected to their loved ones.
  • Alternate methods of communication for other services may be offered when deemed clinically appropriate.

For specific information regarding these changes and limitations, please contact us directly.

CDC updates are consistently monitored to ensure that all guidance followed is based on the latest information released.

  • All staff receives ongoing infection prevention and control training.
  • Thorough disinfection and hygiene guidance is provided.
  • Patient care supplies such as masks and hand sanitizer are monitored and utilized.
  • Temperature and symptom screening protocols are in place for all patients and staff.
  • Social distancing strategies have been implemented to ensure that patients and staff maintain proper distance from one another at all times.
  • Cleaning service contracts have been reviewed for additional support.
  • Personal protective equipment items are routinely checked to ensure proper and secure storage.
  • CDC informational posters are on display to provide important reminders on proper infection prevention procedures.

The safety of our patients, their families, and our employees is our top priority, and we will remain steadfast in our efforts to reduce any risk associated with COVID-19.

The CDC has provided a list of easy tips that can help prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue and then immediately dispose of the tissue.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Clean and disinfect objects and surfaces that are frequently touched.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care.

For detailed information on COVID-19, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

Eating Disorders vs. Disordered Eating: When Is It Time to Seek Treatment?

Sierra Tucson – Ranked #1 in Newsweek’s list of Best Addiction Treatment Centers in Arizona for 2020!

As a society, we put a lot of pressure on ourselves to look, act, and feel a certain way. With the infiltration of, and our obsession with, social media, we are subconsciously (and even sometimes knowingly) comparing ourselves to a perceived image of perfection.

According to the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA), many individuals struggle with body dissatisfaction and disordered eating attitudes and behaviors. And, the best-known contributor to the development of anorexia and bulimia is body dissatisfaction.

Psychology Today reports that up to 50 percent of the U.S. population has experienced some sort of disordered relationship with food, body and exercise. Given that nearly half of Americans are struggling with food issues, makes it even more important to talk about the differences between eating disorders and disordered eating.

Do You Know the Difference?

Eating Disorders include psychological disorders characterized by abnormal or disturbed eating habits:

  • Extreme emotions
  • Attitudes
  • Behaviors surrounding weight and food issues

Eating disorders are serious emotional and physical problems that can have life-threatening consequences for females and males, such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating.

Disordered Eating includes behavior commonly associated with eating disorders, such as:

  • Food restriction
  • Binge eating
  • Feelings of guilt when unable to maintain healthy eating/exercise habits
  • Chronic yo-yo dieting

It’s important to note that while individuals with eating disorders may show signs of disordered eating, not all disordered eaters are diagnosed with or have an eating disorder.

Call a Doctor If…

While nearly 30 million people in the U.S. battle an eating disorder and 50 percent suffer from disordered eating, the numbers are suspected to be far greater because so few seek treatment. Following are some warning signs that it’s time to seek help:

  • Showing signs of anorexia, including rapid weight loss, eating very little, and being overly concerned about weight and appearance
  • Fearful of gaining even a small amount of weight
  • Being secretive or lying about eating habits
  • Feeling the need to exercise excessively, especially after meals
  • Abusing laxatives/diuretics, or vomiting voluntarily
  • Excessive and uncontrollable eating

Family Matters

Positive communication is critical for making a change. One thing we know about families dealing with mental health disorders is that somewhere along the way, communication collapses. When one person in a family behaves in a way that harms others despite their hopes, expectations and previously understood norms, it can cause an entire family to crumble.

At Sierra Tucson, we believe that family involvement is a fundamental part of the recovery process. Because we know that friends and family members are considerably affected by a loved one who is struggling with an eating disorder or any other mental health challenge, their participation is an essential component of our comprehensive treatment programs. Our Sierra Tucson Family Program is available for all family members age 18 and older. The goal of this program is to create a shift in attitudes and behaviors among family members, and provide them with the tools needed to become healthy, supportive figures.

If you would like more information on the Eating Recovery Program at Sierra Tucson, please call our Admissions Coordinators today at (800) 842-4487.